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Vikings bring lacrosse home this weekend

Men's and women's matches will be first collegiate lacrosse in Quad Cities

March  06, 2012

Augustana's women's lacrosse team at a game vs. Berry College in Rome, Ga., last month. The Vikings won the match 25-24.
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The Quad Cities will get its first look at competitive lacrosse at the collegiate varsity level when the men's and women's teams at Augustana host six matches this weekend at Thorson-Lucken Field. The Vikings will host Alma and Fontbonne in matches that will begin on Friday, March ,9 and conclude on Sunday, March 11.

Alma and Fontbonne will tangle in a women's match at 5 p.m. on Friday to kick off the weekend and the Augustana men will play Fontbonne at 7 p.m. On Saturday, the action will resume with Augustana and Fontbonne hooking up in a women's game at 11 a.m. followed by the Fontbonne and Alma men at 1 p.m. The final match on Saturday will be at 5 p.m. and will feature the women's teams from Alma and Augustana. There will be one match on Sunday and it will be between the men's teams from Augustana and Alma at noon.

So far, both Augustana teams have gotten off the strong starts. Sara Tisdale's women are currently 3-2 with wins over Birmingham Southern (20-9 on Feb. 21), Agnes Scott (19-5 on Feb. 22) and Berry (25-24 in 3 overtimes on Feb. 25). The Vikings lost the first (17-16 at Sewanee on Feb. 18) and last (15-7 at Centre on Feb. 27) of the spring trip.

Augustana even broke into the national spotlight when freshman Hilary Kargl (Sacred Heart Academy, Louisville, Ky.) tied an NCAA (all-division) record with 14 goals in the win over Berry. She has scored 35 goals in five games and is averaging 7.00 goals-per-game.

Kyle Hart has his Vikings' men's team at 3-1. They started the spring trip with three straight victories, defeating Millsaps (17-3 on Feb. 22), Huntingdon (11-2 on Feb. 25) and Rhodes (15-2 on Feb. 29) before falling at Hendrix (5-4 on March 20). While the Augustana women have relied on offense (17.4 goals-per-game), the Viking men have done it with defense (3.0 goals-allowed-per-game).

Weekend schedule

Friday, March 9
5 p.m. — Alma vs. Fontbonne (women)
7 p.m. — Fontbonne vs. Augustana (men)

Saturday, March 10
11 a.m. — Fontbonne vs. Augustana (women)
1 p.m. — Fontbonne vs. Alma (men)
5 p.m. — Alma vs. Augustana (women)

Sunday, March 11
Noon — Alma vs. Augustana (men)

About lacrosse

Lacrosse is a team sport of Native American origin. The object of the game is to score by shooting the ball into an opponent's goal, using the lacrosse stick to catch, carry, and pass the ball to do so.

Lacrosse in the United States is played at the collegiate level in both the club and sanctioned team sport. There are 166 Division III men's lacrosse teams and 201 Division III women's teams.

Augustana's men's team competes in the Midwest Lacrosse Conference (MLC). It is a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division III lacrosse-only college athletic conference composed of schools located in the Midwestern United States. All schools are members of other conferences in other sports and formed the MLC until their existing conferences add lacrosse.

The Augustana women's lacrosse team will play for this year as an NCAA Division III independent before joining the Midwest Women's Lacrosse Conference in 2013.

Men's lacrosse rules

• Teams consist of ten players: a goalie, three defensemen, three midfielders and three attackmen.

• Each team must keep at least four players, including the goalie, in its defensive half of the field and three in its offensive half. Three players (midfielders) may roam the entire field.

• Collegiate games are 60 minutes long, with 15-minute quarters.

• Teams change sides between periods. Each team is permitted two timeouts each half. The team winning the coin toss chooses the end of the field it wants to defend first.

• The players take their positions on the field: four in the defensive clearing area, one at the center, two in the wing areas and three in their attack goal area.

• Men's lacrosse begins with a face-off. Center face-offs are also used at the start of each quarter and after a goal is scored. The ball is placed between the sticks of two squatting players at the center of the field. The official blows the whistle to begin play. Each face-off player tries to control the ball. The players in the wing areas can run after the ball when the whistle sounds. The other players must wait until one player has gained possession of the ball, or the ball has crossed a goal area line, before they can release.

• Field players must use their crosses to pass, catch and run with the ball. Only the goalkeeper may touch the ball with his hands. A player may gain possession of the ball by dislodging it from an opponent's crosse (stick) with a stick check. A stick check is the controlled poking and slapping of the stick and gloved hands of the player in possession of the ball.

• Body checking is permitted if the opponent has the ball or is within five yards of a loose ball. All body contact must occur from the front or side, above the waist and below the shoulders, and with both hands on the stick. An opponent's crosse may also be stick-checked if it is within five yards of a loose ball or ball in the air.

• If the ball or a player in possession of the ball goes out of bounds, the other team is awarded possession. If the ball goes out of bounds after an unsuccessful shot, the player nearest to the ball when and where it goes out of bounds is awarded possession.

• An attacking player cannot enter the crease around the goal, but may reach in with his stick to scoop a loose ball.

• A referee, umpire and field judge supervise field play. A chief bench official, timekeepers and scorers assist.

Women's lacrosse rules

• Twelve players constitute a full team: a goalie, three defenders, five midfielders and three attackers. One member acts as the speaking captain. Any number up to 12 players of each team may be on the field of play at the same time.

• Each team must keep at least five players, including the goalie, in its defensive half of the field when on the attack.

• Collegiate games are 60 minutes long, with 30-minute halves.

• Women's lacrosse begins with a draw. A maximum of three players from each team may be between the restraining lines during the draw until the whistle blows. All other players must be below either restraining line. Players must not enter the circle or cross the restraining lines until the whistle blows. If the score is tied at the end of regulation, six minutes (two three-minute periods) of stop-clock overtime will be played, with the teams switching ends between periods. If the score is tied at the end of the six overtime minutes, a sudden-death period of not more than six minutes will be played. The teams will continue to play sudden-death periods of not more than six minutes each — with the teams changing ends each time — until a winner is decided.

• Field players must use their crosses to pass, catch and run with the ball. Only the goalkeeper may touch the ball with her hands.

• A player may gain possession of the ball by dislodging it from an opponent's crosse (stick) with a stick check. A stick check is the controlled poking and slapping of the stick of the player in possession of the ball. Players may only check if the check is directed away from the ball carrier's head. Also, players may only check using the side of their stick. If caught by one of the referees using the flat of the head, it will be called as a "held check" and the opposing team will get the ball.

• When the referee blows the whistle during play everyone must stop exactly where she is. If the ball goes out of bounds on a shot then the player that is closest to the ball receives the possession. If the ball goes out of bounds not on a shot then the other team is awarded with the possession.

• An attacking player cannot enter the crease around the goal, but may reach in with her stick to scoop a loose ball.

• It is highly recommended that three officials be used to umpire the game. A minimum of two officials must be used.

• Cover — during a ground ball a player uses her stick to cover the ball to prevent the other team from obtaining possession. Signal from official is one hand on top of the other.

• Three seconds — when the defense is inside the eight-meter arch for longer than three seconds without guarding a player within a stick's length. Signal from official is a yellow flag, whistle, and then three fingers in the air.

• Shooting space — when a defender enters into the shooter's path to the goal farther than a stick's length away. Signal from official is two hands crossed in front of face.

• Yellow card — Two minute releasable penalty

• Second yellow card — removal from game, teammate serves two-minute penalty.

 

Dave Wrath
Interim Athletic Director, Media/Alumni Relations
Office: (309) 794-7265 Cell: (309) 737-5306 Home: (309) 762-5621
davewrath@augustana.edu