Inside a kindergarten classroom with Augustana students

Monday and Wednesday Domino Madness

Hello Trailblogian Followers!

Because I did not get the chance to blog on Monday, I am going to combine Monday and Wednesday’s blog for Mrs. Carmack’s class.

MONDAY:

It is the beginning of a new week and Dana, Colleen, and I spent the morning discussing and preparing for the different activities the students will be participating in throughout the week. This Monday, however, was a lot less hectic and stressful than the last few because the only activity we prepared for was Domino Sort[1] (explained below).

Domino Sort:

Monday Group 1

Nate was able to recognize domino patterns 1-6 as well as recognize similar patterns on other dominoes. When counting the dots on a domino that had dots on both sides, he would have to begin counting at one.

Ian was also able to recognize domino patterns 1-6. When helped, however, he was able to continue counting the number of dots from the pattern.

  • Example: The domino had 5 dots on one side and 3 on the other. Ian would recognize the pattern 5 and then continue counting 6, 7, 8 to get the correct answer.

Monday Group 2

Hannah could quickly recognize domino patterns 1-6 and could only continue counting the number of dots from the pattern when helped (similar to Ian).

Amber could only recognize domino patterns 1, 2, 3, and 5 but struggled recognizing patterns 4 and 6.

WEDNESDAY:

Domino Sort:

Wednesday Group 1 -

Elaine was able to recognize domino patterns 1-6 and the dominoes that had the pattern + 1 dot on the other side.

Brandy was able to recognize domino patterns 1-3 and had to count each dot with all the other dominoes. She could also recognize when patterns 1-3 were on a domino with more dots on the other side, but had to begin at one to figure out how many dots were on the tile.

Wednesday Group 2

Fiona was able to recognize domino patters 1-6. She was very different than the previous students I worked with because she perceived the dominoes as a math problem, where she identified the pattern on each side and then added the two numbers together.

  • Example: A domino with 5 on one side and 4 on the other – 5 + 4 = 9

Ariana was able to recognize domino patterns 1-6 and the pattern + 1 dot. She could also continue counting the number of dots from the recognized pattern number, but only when directed; otherwise, she always began counting at one.

Wednesday Group 3

Mia was able to recognize domino patterns 1-6. She figured out she could continue counting after the recognized pattern, but only after she covered one side of the domino with her hand.

Kandas recognized domino patterns 1-5 and could recognize the 6 pattern by the end. She could also figure out the other dominoes by covering up one side of the domino, recognizing the pattern number and then continue counting, just as Mia did. She could automatically recognize pattern +1 and +2 without having to cover one side of the domino.

Wednesday Group 4

Erika could recognize patterns 1-5 but struggled seeing the pattern on a domino that had dots on each side.

Orlando could also recognize patterns 1-5 but could recognize the pattern on a domino that had patterns on both sides of the domino. When counting the number of dots on a domino with patterns on both sides, however, he had to begin counting at one.


[1] Domino Sort: Students explore domino number dot patterns and use the part-part-whole relationship to count and place dominoes on a number line.

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