Some Key Findings from our Recent Alumni Survey

Every once in a while you get lucky enough to have multiple studies that all point pretty clearly to the same conclusions.  So in the spirit of Christmas, I give you a gift of confirmatory evidence that all of what we do at Augustana – in the classroom and outside of it – matters for student learning.  Special thanks should go to my student assistant, Melanie, who did all of the data analysis and even wrote the first draft of this post.  Thanks, Melanie!

The Recent Alumni Survey asks a cohort of graduates about their experiences in the nine months since they walked across the stage to receive their diploma. Three items in this survey are designed to get at some of the intended outcomes of an Augustana education.  Those items ask:

  • To what extent do you feel your Augustana experience prepared you to succeed in your current program?
  • To what extent do you feel your Augustana experience prepared you to succeed in your current position/job?
  • To what degree does your current professional/educational status align with your long term career goals?

The first two questions address our graduates’ perception of the quality of their preparation for their next step in adult life, be it graduate school or their first foray into the world of work. Because we care about the full arc of our graduates’ adult lives, the third question addresses the degree to which that “next step” – the one for which our mission demands that we play an important role in preparation and selection, aligns with their long term goals.

To help us improve the quality of an Augustana education, we want to determine the nature of the relationship between college experiences that we already believe to be important (gleaned from our last senior survey) and our graduates’ lives nine months after they graduated. To this end, we linked responses from our 2013 senior survey and same individuals who responded to our recent graduate survey in the winter and early spring of 2014. After identifying which senior survey items significantly predicted (in a statistical sense) these recent alumni outcomes, we expanded our analysis to account for several factors that might confound our findings: race, socio-economic status, gender and cumulative GPA. The table below shows the experiences that emerged as statistically significant positive predictors for each outcome organized by the nature of the environment in which those experiences exist.

  To what degree does your current professional/ educational status align with your long term career goals? To what extent do you feel your Augustana experience prepared you to succeed in your current program? (asked of alums in grad school) To what extent do you feel your Augustana experience prepared you to succeed in your current position/job? (asked of alums in the workforce)
Co-curricular Experiences -My out-of-class experiences have helped me develop a deeper understanding of myself -My out of class experiences helped me develop a deeper understanding of myself*-My out of class experiences helped me develop a deeper understanding of how I relate to others
Advising - How often did your major adviser ask you about your career goals and aspirations? - How often did your major adviser ask you about your career goals and aspirations? - How often did your major adviser ask you about your career goals and aspirations?-My major adviser connected me with other campus resources
Experiences           in the Major -Faculty in this major cared about my development as a whole person-In this major, how frequently did your faculty emphasize making judgments about the value of information, arguments, or methods, such as examining how others gathered and interpreted data and assessing the soundness of their conclusions?
Overall Curricular Experience -My one-on-one interactions with faculty have had a positive influence on my intellectual growth and interests in ideas -My one-on-one interactions with faculty have had a positive influence on my intellectual growth and interests in ideas

Clearly there are multiple experiences across a range of settings that influence these three outcomes. Moreover, these findings are similar to the results of prior alumni data analyses and replicate findings from analyses of senior survey data.  In short, we can be confident that the experiences noted in the table above play a critical role in shaping the success of Augustana graduates.

These findings strongly emphasize the importance of quality and purposeful faculty interactions with students. The item, “my one-on-one interactions with faculty have had a positive influence on my intellectual growth and interests in ideas,” significantly predicted students’ sense of preparedness for both those entering graduate programs and those who went into the workforce. This item focuses on more than the frequency of students’ interactions with faculty or friendliness of those interactions. Instead, this item emphasizes the nature of faculty influence; encouraging, inspiring, cajoling, pushing, prodding, and even challenging students to engage tough questions and complicated ideas while at the same time supporting students as they struggle with the implications and ramifications of their own evolving values, beliefs, and worldview.

Faculty influence was again evident in the advising relationship. The question, “How often did your major adviser ask you about your career goals and aspirations?” significantly predicted all three outcomes. In addition, for graduates in the workforce faculty attention to connecting students with other campus resources also influenced the graduates’ sense of preparedness. Furthermore, faculty impact on our graduates’ success is apparent in the major experiences that predicted students’ sense of preparation for their career. Two items were significantly predictive: “Faculty in this major cared about my development as a whole person,” and “In this major, how frequently did your faculty emphasize making judgments about the value of information, arguments, or methods, such as examining how others gathered and interpreted data and assessing the soundness of their conclusions?” In addition to confirming the caring aspect of quality and purposeful faculty interactions with students, this finding also highlights the value of classroom experiences that cultivate higher order thinking skills.

It is also worth noting the importance of out-of-class experiences in predicting our graduates’ success. Again, the importance of the developmental quality of these experiences is paramount. Instead of items that denote participation in particular types of organizations or activities, the items that proved predictive emphasize that the experiences that matter are ones that help students develop in two ways. First, they help students develop a deeper understanding of themselves.  Second, they help students develop a deeper understanding of how they relate to others. Obviously, these skills are critical for success in every manner of adult life.  The key for Augustana is to ensure that every out-of-class experience contributes – directly or indirectly – to this kind of growth.

The goal of this analysis was not to determine which experiences (faculty interactions or co-curricular experiences) play a larger role in shaping Augustana graduates’ outcomes. Instead, it is clear that all facets of the Augustana education contribute to our students’ success.  It is also clear that not all graduates experience Augustana in a way that maximizes the potential impact of quality and purposeful faculty interaction or developmental out-of-class activities.  Throughout the institution, we can use these findings as principled guidelines to improving the work that we do with our students.

Make it a good day (and a great holiday break),

Mark

Work hard, party hard!

Last week, the Chronicle of Higher Education ran a series of articles and commentaries on the discomforting relationship between colleges and alcohol. Not surprisingly, they began the first article (“A River of Booze“) with the stereotypical “beer and circus” images of a large flagship university. Although much of what I read reminded me of the struggles I observed during my time at the University of Iowa, our residence life staff reminded me that many of the student justifications for drinking noted in these articles sound just like comments made by our own Augustana students.

So instead of writing something myself, this week I’m just going to refer you to this series of articles in the Chronicle. I’ve inserted the link to the opening piece above, and I’ve added another that digs into the challenges that colleges and universities have faced in trying to address dangerous drinking behaviors here.

Although we might be a small college, we struggle with many of the same issues noted by the Chronicle reporters. I hope you’ll find some time to read some of these articles and find out more about our own students’ alcohol-related behaviors. Like a lot of things, we will only succeed in addressing these issues to the degree that we tackle them together.

Make it a good day,

Mark

What is your definition of a “Plan B?”

I often get pegged as “the numbers guy.” Even though the words themselves seem pretty simple, I’m never really sure how to interpret that phrase. Sometimes people seem to use it to defer to my area of expertise (and that feels nice). But sometimes it seems vaguely dismissive, as if they’re a little surprised to find that I’ve escaped from my underground statistical production bunker (that doesn’t feel so nice).

With data points, it’s not the numbers by themselves that make the difference; it’s the meaning that gets assigned to them. The same is true with phrases that we all too often toss around without a second thought. I stumbled into a prime example of this issue recently while talking to several folks about the way that they think about helping students prepare for life after college. It turns out that we can run ourselves into a real buzzsaw of a problem if we don’t mean the same thing when we talk to students about developing a “Plan B.”

Essentially, a Plan B is simple – it’s a second plan if the first plan doesn’t work out. But underneath that sort of obvious definition lies the rub. For what purpose does the Plan B exist? Is it to get to a new and different goal, or is it to take an alternative path to get to the original goal?

For some, helping a student construct a Plan B means identifying a second career possibility in case the student’s first choice post-graduation plan doesn’t work out. For example, a student who intends to be a doctor may not have the grades or references to guarantee acceptance into med school. At this point, a faculty adviser might suggest that the student investigate other careers that might match some of the student’s other interests (maybe in another health field, maybe not). This definition of a Plan B assumes a career change and then begins to formulate a plan to move toward that new goal.

But for others, helping a student construct a Plan B doesn’t mean changing career goals at all. Instead, this definition of a Plan B recognizes that there are often multiple pathways to get into a particular career. For the aspiring med school student who may not have slam-dunk grades in biology or chemistry but still wants to be a doctor, one could envision a Plan B that includes taking a job at a hospital in some sort of support role, retaking specific science courses at a local university or college, then applying to medical school with stronger credentials, potentially better references, and more experience. In this case the end goal didn’t change at all. The thing that changed was the path to get there.

In no way am I suggesting that one definition of a Plan B is better than another. On the contrary, both are entirely appropriate. In fact, the student would probably be best served by laying out both possibilities and walking through the relevant implications. But the potential for a real disaster comes when two people (maybe a faculty member and a career adviser) are separately talking to the same student about the need to devise a Plan B, yet the faculty member and the adviser mean very different things when they use the same phrase.

As you can imagine, the student would probably feel as though he or she is getting conflicting advice. In addition, she might well think that the person encouraging a different career choice just doesn’t believe in her (and that the person suggesting an alternate path to her original career goal is the one who really cares about her). Moreover, the person encouraging the student to explore another career choice might feel seriously undermined by the person who has suggested to the student an alternative way to continue toward the original career goal. In the end, a student’s trust in our ability to guide them accurately and effectively is seriously eroded and a rift has likely developed between the two individuals who both genuinely care about the student in question.

Absolutely, there are times when we have to tell students that they need to explore alternative career plans. We do them no favors by placating them. At the same time, we all know students who, although they seemed to lack motivation and direction when they were at Augustana, kicked it in after graduation and eventually found a way into the career they had always wanted to pursue.

I’m certainly not suggesting that we should adopt one official definition of the phrase “Plan B.” Rather, my suspicion is that this is one of those phrases that we use often without realizing that we might not all mean the same thing. If our goal is to collectively give students the kind of guidance that they need to succeed after graduation, we probably ought to make sure that in each case we all mean the same thing when we talk to a student about a Plan B.

Make it a good day,

Mark

 

“Lean” in and learn something new

I think it’s fair to say that most educators cringe at the idea of applying practices from the world of business to education. So many times we’ve read or heard someone talk about education as if it were a cursory transaction where students or parents simply purchase a product as an investment toward future earnings. Of course, one only needs to spend a few days trying to get students to learn something that contests their prior assumptions to know that viewing education through such a transactional lens leads to a gross misunderstanding of what we do and how education works. I’d love to see a list of all the times when a business framework was misapplied to an educational setting with disastrous results.

So, does this mean that everything developed in a business setting is guaranteed to fail in an educational setting? It’s okay if you’re inclined to say “yes” (especially if you’ve been down that road a few times). When President Bahls suggested that we could apply principles of lean management to improve a variety of processes at Augustana College, I’ll admit that I shuddered. Maybe like you, I imagined an internal apocalypse: budget cuts and position reductions with no changes in expectations. But after reading up on the concept of lean management and spending last week as a member of the first Rapid Improvement Team, I have to admit that my shudder was merely emblematic of my own ignorance. While lean management has its own set of terminology that might seem foreign to educators, the values embedded in a lean management philosophy embody the same values that we aspire to uphold in a collaborative and transparent organization dedicated to educating students. I found the framework and the process to be deeply gratifying and potentially applicable to the range of domains in which we operate.

First, “lean” doesn’t mean thinner.  It’s not about losing weight, downsizing, or cutting out the fat. It’s not an acronym. The term refers to the degree to which processes are conducted efficiently while best serving the needs of the beneficiary (i.e., anyone who benefits from that process).

Second, lean management philosophy asserts that the people best positioned to make improvement happen are those who are intimately involved in that particular job or process. Not only do those folks know the ins and outs of that work better than anyone else; they also need to believe in the efficacy of any identified changes in order to give those changes the best chance of turning into demonstrable and lasting improvements. For these reasons, any attempt to improve a process must genuinely involve the people who do that work.

Third, lean management philosophy argues that improvement of a process is exemplified in those who benefit from that process. Although the beneficiaries of our work are often students, we often conduct operations that benefit more than just students. The beneficiaries of payroll are anyone who gets paid. The beneficiaries of the salad bar are anyone who eats a salad. As a result, the way to determine if we have improved a process is to identify clear means of demonstrating an improved impact on the beneficiaries of that process.

Fourth, lean management starts with the belief that the collective ability of an organization’s people can find and put in place substantial improvements to a process.  Effective lean management begins by collaborating to develop a shared understanding of the current state of a process or problem.  Only after the problem is fully understood as something worthy of improvement would an improvement team begin to consider potential solutions.

Fifth, lean management philosophy focuses on continual improvement, not perfection. There are simply too many external and unpredictable influences to expect perfection.  Furthermore (especially in the work that we do), just when we find that a particularly education practices works well, the students change and we have to continue to adjust.

Everything the Rapid Improvement Team did last week reflected all of these values.  I was impressed with the way the process was designed to keep them at the forefront while moving us toward a set of suggestions that were extremely likely to improve the process.

If you would like to see a recording of the presentation from the Rapid Improvement Team from last Friday, you can see it here.

Ultimately, the lesson I learned from this process was that it is possible (shocking, I know) for something that has been developed in the business world over the last several decades to be applied successfully in an educational institution in a way that actually strengthens our ability to enact the values we espouse.  In addition, I (re)learned that we have some amazing people at Augustana who are willing to put their hearts into doing what we do better. I’m lucky to be a part of it.

Make it a good day,

Mark

 

A taste of my own medicine

One of the fundamental tenets of Delicious Ambiguity has been that all of us who contribute to the development of students are at our best when we approach our work through a lens of “positive restlessness.” That phrase was introduced into the lexicon of higher education writers by George Kuh and his colleagues in their book Student Success in College, describing a pervasive philosophy that his research team saw at colleges that always seemed to be seeking out ways to get better no matter how successful they already were. Anyone who knows me recognizes that I relish the chance to look for ways to improve. But I think it is an entirely fair criticism to suggest that I might have an overly rosy view of change and that I should be forced to get elbow-deep in the down-and-dirty work of actually fixing a complicated and convoluted process.

So this week, if you’ve ever thought that I needed a dose of your version of reality, you are in luck. My “comeuppance” has appeared in the form of participation in a weeklong, immersive Rapid Improvement Event (RIE). I’ll be joining a team of Augustana employees trying to wrangle a portion of the payroll process and hopefully improve it. I don’t know much about payroll – so they tell me I’m “perfect” for the job.

So here goes!

Make it a good day,

Mark

 

Hey; what’s this I hear about the Winding Path Study?

Some of you have heard me mention a study that we (AKA our massive juggernaut of an IR office better known to most of you as Kimberly and Mark) started last spring called the Winding Path Study. In short, this study was designed to gather information from all living Augustana alumni (at least those for whom we had working email addresses) about the nature of their adult lives from the time they entered Augustana up until last spring.

During the twelve months of strategic planning discussions, one of the things that stood out to me was how much we really don’t know about the long-term impact of an Augustana education. Don’t get me wrong; we have lots of wonderful stories about Augustana graduates excelling in all sorts of professional and personal pursuits. But we don’t know nearly as much as we would like about the nature of our alum’s lives after college: the ways that they have handled success and failure, the adjustments they have had to make when life throws them a curveball, or the ways that their Augustana experiences might have influenced twists and turns in their life’s path right after graduation or much later in life. This information matters because, if we are preparing students to succeed throughout their adult lives, we need to know how those lives play out across personal and professional domains and as our alums grow and change over time.

After looking through all of the different ways that colleges have tried to survey their alumni, we couldn’t find any approach that matched our conceptual frame or addressed the questions we had constructed. So we rolled up our metaphorical sleeves and built a study from scratch based on the sociological theory of Life Course Perspective, a construct that describes the life course as a series of trajectories, transitions, and turning points.

In this post I’d like to share a few summary findings just to give you a flavor for what we’ve seen from the almost 2,800 responses we received last spring in the first stage of this project.

The first two questions explored the nature of our alum’s path when entering Augustana and moving through their undergraduate years.

  • Did you have a specific career goal or major in mind when you came to Augustana?
    • 53% – Yes; I was pretty sure I knew what I wanted to do
    • 33% – Somewhat; I had some ideas but wasn’t set on anything in particular
    • 12% – No; I didn’t know what I wanted to do at all
  • Did you change majors or career goals while you were an undergraduate?
    • 38% – Yes
    • 61% – No
  •  What path did you take right after graduation from Augustana?
    • 26% – Went to grad school in the same field that I studied
    • 8% –   Went to grad school in a different field than I studied
    • 42% – Took a job or volunteered in the same field that I studied
    • 15% – Took a job or volunteered in a different field than I studied
    • 2% –   Took time off to pursue other interests
    • 7% –   Other

The next set of questions explored the varied nature of our graduates’ adult lives. Although we couldn’t have possibly captured every facet of an adult life, our goal was to gather a first glimpse that could be explored in more detail later.

  • How many times have you changed jobs since you graduate from Augustana?
    • 16% – None
    • 27% – 1-2
    • 28% – 3-4
    • 16% – 5-6
    • 11% – 7 or more
  • How many of those job changes occurred because of a professional opportunity that you chose to pursue?
    • 22% – None
    • 36% – 1-2
    • 22% – 3-4
    • 11% – 5-6
    • 5% –   7 or more
  • How many of those job changes occurred because of a professional disruption (downsizing, bankruptcy, termination, etc.)?
    • 67% – None
    • 23% – 1-2
    • 3% –   3-4
    • 1% –   5-6
    • 0% –   7 or more
  • Were any of your job changes influenced by family considerations?
    • 39% – Yes
    • 56% – No
  • Were any of your job changes influenced by personal considerations?
    • 54% – Yes
    • 41% – No

(Please note that some folks didn’t respond to every question, resulting in some proportions equaling less than 100%).

These findings deepened our understanding of the variety of pathways that students pursue after college.  Almost one quarter of our graduates, immediately after college, entered graduate school or took a job in a different field than their major.  These findings also strengthened our belief that preparing students for successful lives after college goes far beyond one’s major or minor and extends long past the first job, first graduate school degree, or whatever the first thing a student chooses to do after college might be.

As you can also see, many if not most Augustana alumni have likely led adult lives that look more like winding paths than straight lines. These findings – even if they might seem fairly obvious to anyone who has lived through the reality of an unpredictable life – have shaped our thinking as we continue to design a college experience that prepares every student to carve through life after college – no matter what comes out of the woodwork.

The first stage of this study concluded with a question at the end of the survey asking if the respondent would be willing to participate in a half-hour interview.  Based on prior research experience, we expected 100-200 positive responses.  We received over 1,400 positive responses!  So the next step for us, after spending the last six months analyzing all of the open-ended responses, is to develop a framework for the interviews and how we will select potential interviewees.  We would like to interview as many as possible, but frankly, the specter of 1,400 interviews is a bit daunting! Moreover, because we also asked other categorizing information like the year the respondent graduated, their major, and their current profession, we have all kinds of ways that we can organize and analyze this data.

Over the rest of the academic year, I hope I’ll have another update on the results of the second phase of this study. In the mean time, enjoy the last week of the fall term!

Make it a good day,

Mark

Data doesn’t have to be numbers

As some of you might know, every once in a while I get asked to talk to other colleges or universities about my study abroad research. Yesterday I was fielding some questions at one such workshop, when a faculty member who takes students on study abroad trips told a story of her experiences talking to her students about what they had learned during their trip abroad. She talked at length about the students’ description of their own growth but ended her statement by saying, “Of course, I don’t have any data on this.”

I hear that line so often when talking with faculty or student affairs staff about their experiences with students.  And although I’m sure I’ll say this again at some point (and hopefully in a kind and caring way!), I just wanted to quickly say to anyone reading this blog today . . . Data is information.  Sometimes information comes in the form of numbers. Sometimes information comes in the form of comments.  Sometimes information comes in the form of student assignments.  Data does not have to be numbers. In fact, sometimes the worst data out there comes in the form of numbers. So if you have information about students that comes from data you have gathered, then you have data. It might be indicative of something that a broader swath of students experience, or it might just be illustrative of the small group of students that provided that data.  But it’s ALL data.

The subtitle of this blog is “using evidence to improve student learning.”  Evidence comes in all forms, and information that qualifies as evidence must go through a vetting process that doesn’t have to be numerical. So if you have data that you think qualifies as evidence – bring it!  Please don’t hesitate or worse, short-change yourself and your work, by thinking that it only qualifies if it comes in numbers.  That’s just not so.

Make it a good day,

Mark

When does a stereotype lose it’s margin of truth?

As we tumble down the back side of the fall term, I know that the potential value of a long and involved blog post drops like a stone in the face of the ten things that have to be solved right now(!).  So I’m gonna just roll out one big-picture data point and let you mull it over when you get a chance to breathe.

Remember that economic collapse that wrecked the economy and scared the pants off of tuition dependent college like us?  Yeah, sorry – not the best way to start the week.  Although there are a few reasons to think that the American economy might be slowly pulling out of its nose dive, we all know that the ripple effects haven’t abated much.

I’ve been trolling our three years of senior survey data lately to look for trends that might be worth noting (see last week’s post on a couple of general education items).  This morning one set of numbers really jumped out at me; the increasing proportion of our students who qualify for Pell Grants – a group of students who almost certainly wouldn’t be at Augustana if it weren’t for need-based financial aid from the federal government and the state of Illinois through the MAP grant program.

The table below shows the increase in this aspect of our student population over the past three classes.  I’ve included the actual numbers in parentheses to add some perspective.

Cohort % Pell Recipients as entering freshmen % Pell Recipients as graduating seniors
Fall of 2008 – Spring of 2012 12.5% (80/641) 10.7% (51/476)
Fall of 2009 – Spring of 2013 17.5% (108/616) 14.2% (66/465)
Fall of 2010 – Spring of 2014 24.6% (185/753) 22.4% (119/532)

You can see that over a relatively short period of time, we’ve roughly doubled the proportion of students who receive Pell Grants (and therefore also received MAP Grants from the state of Illinois).  If you look closely, you can see a hint of this lower socioeconomic status on retention and graduation, since the proportion of these students shrinks over the course of four years.

Just in case you were wondering, 26.2% of our student body (655/2500) of our current overall student body is receiving a Pell Grant.  And among our newest class of freshmen, 28.1% are receiving Pell Grants.

The headline of this blog referred to the stereotype that we like to throw around about our students coming from the Chicago suburbs.  Sometimes I hear that stereotype dressed up with healthy dose of wealth, homogeneity, and entitlement.  I’m not trying to suggest that those students don’t exist at Augustana.  Of course they do.  But the thing about these numbers that hit me was this:

  • We have a trend in our data that suggests a growing proportion (now over a quarter of our student body) of our students that, at least on one critical dimension, don’t conform to that stereotype.
  • Are we adapting our expectations and interactions with our students to match what we know about from whence they come?

Make it a good day,

Mark

What is the role of general education? Some ominous shadows in the data

Despite a genuine commitment to a liberal arts mission, at times it seems easier said than done. On one hand, public fretting (some of it well founded) about unemployed and apparently unemployable college graduates has made some suggest that a college education should focus more of its coursework on preparation for a specific career. On the other hand, the proliferation of knowledge and sub-disciplines within many academic fields translates into more knowledge that faculty often believe (sometimes rightly) need to be added to the range of concepts covered within a particular major. Both of these tangible pressures bolster the argument for expanding the footprint of the major. By comparison, the counter-arguments for maintaining a robust general education program tend to be more abstract and sadly, rarely stand a chance.

Two trends (one macro and one micro) highlight the declining clout of general education. First, the number of U.S. colleges classified as liberal arts colleges has dropped substantially in the last several decades (from 212 to 130). Most of this change involves institutions that expanded their educational offerings into more vocational and pre-professional programs. Closer to home, the proportion of Augustana students who earn at least two majors continues to increase (over 45% of graduates in 2014). In the case of Augustana students, our double majors don’t stay in college longer than everyone else, they just concentrate more of the credits they earn in specific areas.

During last year’s conversations about the relative impact of general education and potential improvements that could be made, some seemed to suggest that our general education program was not in need of revisions. One of the questions posed was whether or not our senior survey data might provide evidence to inform this conversation. Now that we have a third year of senior survey findings, I thought it might be useful to explore the responses to the survey’s general education items and look for any patterns or hints of trends. I’m not sure that the findings below provide definitive answers, but I hope they will further inform the discussion and direction of the general education conversation at Augustana.

The Augustana Senior Survey includes six questions intended to assess the nature of students’ experiences in their non-major or general education courses. Interestingly, the lowest average response score over the last three years came from the 2014 seniors on five of the six questions. Further analysis indicated that the drop from highest to lowest score was statistically significant for four of those questions. They are listed in the table below.

Senior Survey Gen Ed Question 2012 2013 2014
The skills I learned in my general education courses helped me succeed in my major courses. (response options – strongly disagree, disagree, neutral, agree, strongly agree) 3.55 3.43 3.38
My classes outside my major(s) challenged me to produce my best academic work. (response options – strongly disagree, disagree, neutral, agree, strongly agree) 3.57 3.53 3.44
In your non-major courses, about how often were you asked to include different perspectives (different races, religions, genders, political beliefs, etc.) in class discussions or writing assignments? (response options – never, rarely, sometimes, often, very often) 3.50 3.52 3.41
About how often did you discuss ideas from your non-major courses with faculty members outside of class? (response options – never, rarely, sometimes, often, very often) 2.88 2.82 2.76

I fully admit that three years of data is not nearly enough to make predictive claims or produce some sort of smoking gun. However, it is enough data to begin triangulating these findings with others (everything from observational to rigorously quantitative data) and look for evidence of multiple findings moving in the same direction. This can be a particularly effective way to identify early “shadows” in the data and give us time to consider their implications in a less reactive environment.

It would be entirely reasonable to expect some fluctuation on average response scores for individual items across multiple years. But it struck me as curious that the responses to so many of the general education items – questions that I think represent the way that we imagine our general education courses functioning at a liberal arts college – moved together in a negative direction.

What might explain this phenomenon? Is it a function of our students feeling an increased pressure to focus on career preparation? Could it be a function of our own subtle leanings toward areas of our own expertise? Or could it be that we lack a clear sense of exactly how our general education requirements link together to form the kind of integrated breadth of understanding that would ultimately produce the ideal liberally educated student?

I don’t know the answer to any of these questions. But these findings did make me think again about our discussion of the role of general education and the degree to which we may need to revisit our commitment to 1) the role of general education and 2) the way we ensure that our general education program helps students develop all of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that we know are critical to their success after graduation.

Make it a good day,

Mark