The worldwide Augustana College experience

Budapest, Hungary

Guten Tag!

Yesterday we took a day trip to Budapest Hungary.  We left at the ungodly hour of 6:00 am to catch our 3 1/2 hour train to Budapest.  We stayed in the compartments in the train like you always see in the movies.  When looking outside, I often felt that I was looking at the US, rather than Austira and Hungary.  On the way there we saw fantastic views including many wind farms.

vienna-338
Maria and Mary on the train
vienna-336
Wind Farms on the way to Budapest

Once arriving in Budapest, the language barrier was even worse.  Having taken a couple of German classes in college I could somewhat communicate with people in Austria, but I was pretty much useless when it came to talking to people in Hungary.  Our first stop on our trip was to the Semmelweis museum.  In order to get to this museum we had to walk across one of the windiest bridges I have ever been on.  I was surprised that no one blew away. 

Budapest
Budapest

Semmelweis was a Hungarian physcian who worked at the Vienna General Hospital.  He was the one of the first people to use hand washing to reduce the spread of dieseases between patients, mostly women and childbed fever. 

The Grave of Semmelweis
The Grave of Semmelweis

After the museum we went to the Dohány Street Synagogue.  This is the largest Synagogue in Europe.  This synagogue includes not only the temple, but there are many memorials to people that were killed in the Holocaust during World War II.  One specific memorial is a statue of a tree that has the names off all those that were killed in Auschwitz during World War II.  There is also a memorial to Raoul Wallenberg, which the Hall in Denkman is named after.  He helped many Jewish people escape the Nazis during the war. 

Dohány Street Synagogue

Dohány Street Synagogue

Memorial to those that died in the Holocaust

Memorial to those that died in the Holocaust

Leaves that contain the names of those that died.

Leaves that contain the names of those that died.

Memorial to Raoul Wallenberg
 
This was a very moving place to be.  There was also a memorial of graves that had 8,000 people buried that did not die in concentration camps, but rather died living in the Jewish ghetto from starvation, dehydration, and disease. 
After the long and exhausting day, we got back on the train to come home. 
Thanks for reading and next week I will be traveling to Brno, Czech Rupublic and Munich, Germany.
Tschuss! 

Leave a Reply