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Biology

Pre-medicine and biochemistry major Christina Scribano is conducting a research project with Dr. Scott Gehler on the molecular mechanisms involved in breast cancer metastasis.

  • Careers/internships
  • About the program
  • What students say

About half of Augustana biology majors go to graduate school for basic biology, genetics and ecology, or medical, dental, nursing or veterinarian programs. Others go on for graduate studies in optometry, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physical therapy or physician's assistant careers.

Graduates may be found at the universities and medical schools of Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, California State, Southern Illinois, Western Illinois, Northwestern and many more.

Augustana graduates who go straight into their careers are employed at hospitals, industry and government. Among them are Eli Lilly, Abbott Laboratories, Amoco, the Shedd Aquarium, the FBI and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Many biology majors participate in Augustana's summer Texas Medical Center Internship Program in Houston. For example, 2013 grad Doug Peters worked in Dr. Mary K. Estes's molecular virology lab at Baylor College of Medicine. Peters is currently in the doctorate program in microbiology at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

This storytelling map shows where some biology graduates are and what they're doing.

More 2013 graduates:

Emma Baldwin was offered a job at the Living Desert Zoo in southern California after having an internship there.

Hannah Hart's Senior Inquiry project in prokaryotic genomics under Dr. Lori Scott was a peak experience. Now Hart is at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine.

Kai Yin (Queenie) Ho is studying biological anthropology at St. John's College, University of Cambridge, through the Davies-Jackson Scholarship.

Augustana offers a biology major and minor, a biology teaching major and a major in pre-medicine, as well as coordinated degree programs and affiliation with graduate programs in the professional health sciences.

Biology is the primary major for students in the pre-professional health fields: medicine, veterinary medicine, physical therapy, occupational therapy, optometry and dentistry. Students can begin the general biology major and choose a specific program later.

All biology majors are required to engage in the scientific process by conducting a research project before they graduate. Most complete research projects on campus, for example as part of the Senior Inquiry curriculum. Many others are accepted into off-campus research experiences, including internships, in a diversity of biology-related environments and locations, which can be viewed in this storytelling map of current students.

Facts and distinctions

The 13 department faculty all have a Ph.D. and specialize in different areas. All teach both lecture and lab portions of their classes.

Augustana's international study terms often include biology work, such as ethnozoology in Latin America and conservation in Ghana.

Augustana ranks among the top 60 U.S. small liberal arts colleges in the sciences, based on the number of graduates earning a Ph.D.

Augustana offers study in a human cadaver lab, one of very few undergraduate institutions to do so.

The college owns three environmental field stations totaling more than 600 acres. Courses at the stations include study of local flora, entomology, aquatic biology and environmental sampling for vertebrates. Research includes prairie restoration, animal ecology and conservation biology.

Emma Baldwin '13, biology and Spanish; working at The Living Desert Zoo in southern California after completing an internship there
"My peak experience was definitely my zookeeping internship at a zoo in California during winter term of my senior year. I got hands-on keeping experience with new species in a zoo accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. I even got hired as a temporary keeper during my internship! This experience helped me discover exactly where I want to be after graduation. As a freshman, I also didn’t realize the value of a liberal arts education — but now I know it is vital in becoming the well-rounded individual today’s employers are looking for."

Hannah Hart '13, biology and pre-veterinary medicine; attending the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine
"Attending vet school was always my goal, but I don’t think I realized how much I would grow personally and academically in my four years at Augustana. There are so many resources on campus to help students get where they want to go, and I found myself surrounded by the most amazing, driven, talented and passionate students, faculty and staff. I know that they played a big part in my development into a more confident individual and a more able scientist. I didn’t imagine that I would achieve such growth when I started my undergraduate career."

Kai Yin (Queenie) Ho '13, anthropology and biology; studying biological anthropology at St. John's College, University of Cambridge, after receiving the $50,000 Davies-Jackson Scholarship
"I chose Augustana College because of its emphasis on the liberal arts. I knew that at Augie I could pursue interests and studies in disciplines besides my major. Before moving to the United States, my family spent several years in Guam, where I became interested in cultural studies. During high school, I was introduced to the biological sciences, and I have been pursuing both interests ever since. Now I am pursuing a course of study in biological anthopology at my dream school. I couldn’t ask for more."

Exhibit shows insects and art together

Captured: Using Insects to Inspire Art will be on display through Nov. 6 at Augustana's Thomas Tredway Library. Visitors are welcome to view the exhibit during library hours. Augustana faculty, staff, students and their families are invited to a Family Night from 6-8 p.m. Sept. 17. Admission is free.

College to participate in wetlands restoration

Augustana College and its Upper Mississippi Studies Center have pledged $17,000 in in-kind contributions as part of a $200,000-plus project to restore a 225-acre wetland in Moline and improve Rock River water quality. River Action Inc., based in Davenport, is spearheading the project. Augustana students and staff will help identify invasive plants for removal, and do inventory and monitoring.

Hello Greenland!

Senior Fallon Meyer is blogging about her work with Dr. Jennifer Burnham in Greenland this summer. The research is centered around the biogeography of seabird colonies and the impacts that global climate change and humans may have on them.
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