News and Announcements

Meet Alyssa, Pavo, and Rachel.  Pavo is the new presiding genius for Old Main 125.  He's a Fourth Century Roman mosaic peacock.  We are grateful to the Paul Anderson Endowment in the Arts for making this acquisition and for placing Pavo where, after more than a millenium and a half, Classics students can bring him back to daily life.  Pavo is Latin for peacock.  Alyssa and Rachel study Classics in Old Main 125.


 

Web Contest for High School Latinists

The department is proud to sponsor its fifth annual contest in the construction of a web site on a Classical theme. The contest is open to middle school and high school Latin students. There will be three prizes: $100, $75, and $50. For all the details, see the Augustana Web Contest page. The contest is underwritten by the Harry S. B. Johnson Endowment for Classics at Augustana.


Augustana's 2007 laureates

in Eta Sigma Phi, the national Classics honor society,

were recognized on stage in Centennial Hall

during the Academic Honors Convocation

Thursday, May 10, 2007. at 10:30 Ante Meridiem.

Macte Estote Doctrina!

 

Alyssa Bevans
Nicholas Dee
Adam Langdon
Erika Lee
Deidre Leist

Life-long membership for Augustana Eta Sigma Phi laureates is underwritten by the Harry S. B. Johnson Endowment for Classics at Augustana, in memory of Dr. Johnson's devotion to Classical studies in the College.

 


High School Latin Students: Augustana College Scholarships for Classics Students

Latin Teachers: Scholarships for Your College-Bound Students

Awards in the amount of $2,500 per annum are available to students with a Latin background who are entering Augustana next Fall. See Scholarships.


Award of A.I.A. Memberships for Majors

The department is highly pleased to announce that, thanks to the generous support of the Harry S. B. Johnson Endowment for Classics at Augustana, our undergraduate majors can now receive annual memberships in the Archaeological Institute of America. Just ask, artefactual majors, and we'll whisk through the dab of AIA paperwork.

The benefits are sometimes tangible (e.g., the newsletter of new developments, which is almost a journal), sometimes intangible (e.g., the knowledge one is now a participant in the quest for, as the A.I.A. motto , together with Vergil) has it, "VIRVM MONVMENTA PRIORVM."


The courses in Classics for 2007-2008 are:

 

Greek 101 - 102 - 103  3+3+3credits.  Fall, Winter, Spring.

C period(11:30 - 12:45 MWF), Old Main 125. K. Day

Latin 101 - 102 - 103   3+3+3 credits.  Fall, Winter, Spring.  

D period (1:00 - 2:15 MW F), Old Main 125. E. Kramer
                     

Fall Term

LS 111-05: Love and Justice: The Beautiful and the Good. B period. Sorensen 257. E. Kramer

LS 111-12: Origins in Western Political Thought and Structure. E period. Old Main 124. E. Kramer

 

CL 230 Women in Classical Antiquity(Perspectives P and DB period. Old Main 125. K. Day

GK 230 Women in Classical Antiquity(Perspectives P and DB period. Old Main 125. K. Day

LT 230 Women in Classical Antiquity(Perspectives P and DB period. Old Main 125. K. Day

 

WL 226 Classical Laughter.  (L) B period. Old Main 125. K. Day

GK 226 Classical Laughter.  (L) B period.Old Main 125. K. Day

LT 226 Classical Laughter.   (L) B period. Old Main 125. K. Day

WL 212 Greek Mythology (L) A period. Old Main 125. K. Day

WL 228 Classical Epic (L) B period. Old Main 125. E. Kramer

GK 228 Classical Epic. (L) B period. Old Main 125. E. Kramer

LT 228 Classical Epic. (L) B period. Old Main 125. E. Kramer


CL 111 Greek and Latin for Science

10:30 - 11:20 Tuesdays (Period 4), Old Main122. E. Kramer


About Classics and Classics at Augustana

To the Augustana Home Page

Please send communications about this page to:

Email to E. Kramer, Chair, Department of Classics

By post:

Emil Kramer
Department of Classics
Augustana College
Rock Island, IL 61201-2296

By telephone: 309-794-7378
By fax: 309-794-7702


Updated 22 May 2007


The Classics section of the Augustana Catalog

With Links to Instructors

Classics

Kirsten Day, Assistant Professor
B.A., Rice; M.A., Ph.D., Arkansas

Emil A. Kramer, Associate Chair
B.A., Texas; M.A., Georgia; Ph.D., Cincinnati

Robert D. Haak, Professor (Religion, Hebrew)

MAJOR IN CLASSICS (emphasis in Greek or in Latin). Eight Classics courses and two required supporting courses, distributed as follows:

Classics courses (24 credits): Three Greek courses or three Latin courses numbered above 200; two courses numbered above 300 in the same language; 401; and two other courses in Greek or Latin. These last two may not include CL 111 or 101, 102 or 103 in the same language as the other five Greek or Latin courses.

Required supporting courses (6 credits): History 214 or 215; one of Art History 165, 361, 362, 363, 364, English 307, 350, 352, 353, Philosophy 240, 311, 318, 321, Religion 310, 311, 360; Speech 320.

MAJOR FOR TEACHING LATIN. 34 credits for a first field, 21 for a second field. Please see the Director of Secondary Education and the Chair of Classics.

MINOR IN CLASSICS. Six courses (18 credits), distributed as follows:

Core language and literature: Three Greek courses or three Latin courses numbered above 200, with at least one of the three numbered above 300.

Linguistic and disciplinary diversity: Three courses in one of the following areas: 1) three courses in the other classical language. 2) Art History 165, 361, 362, 363, 364; English 307, 350, 352; History 214, 215; Philosophy 240, 311, 318, 321; Religion 310, 311, 360; Speech 320. 3) Hebrew 100-101-102 and one of the preceding courses in Greek, Latin, art history, English, history, philosophy or religion.


COURSES

Classics courses in Classics (CL) World Literature (WL), Greek (GK) and Latin (LT) are organized into groups as follows:

Classical Lyric Poetry: WL 214, GK 214/314, LT 214/314. K. Day .

Literature of the Cosmopolis :WL 216, GK 216/316, LT 216/316. K. Day.

Medieval Latin Literature: WL220, LT 220/320.  K. Day .

The Art of History: WL 222, GK 222/322, LT 222/322. E. Kramer.

Classical Tragedy: WL 224, GK 224/324, LT 224/324. K. Day.

Classical Laughter: WL 226, GK226/326, LT 226/326.  K. Day .

Classical Epic: WL 228, GK 228/328, LT 228/328. E. Kramer.

Women in Classical Antiquity: CL 230, GK 230/330, LT 230/330 K. Day


Classics courses for which no knowledge of Greek or Latin is required: (CL):

111 Greek and Latin Terms for Science (1)   E. Kramer .

A systematic approach to the large vocabulary of the life sciences via the relatively small number of Greek and Latin base-words underlying it.The course takes up these base-words, the patterns in which they change, and the forms they take in anatomical and scientific names. The course may not be counted towards a Classics major.

230 [P, D] Women in Classical Antiquity (3) K. Day

How Greek and Roman women lived in the world of the ancient Mediterranean, including the physical spaces they occupied, the roles they played, and the laws that governed them. Examination of the ways the ancient Greeks and Romans defined the categories of masculine and feminine and how these categories were used in discourses of literature, politics, law, religion, and medicine. Additionally, how these ancient conceptions of gender have shaped our contemporary views of male and female gender roles. Precludes taking other courses in the Women in Antiquity group (GK 230/330, LT 230/330).


Courses in World Literature

The following World Literature courses from Classics are described in the World Literature section of this catalog.

212 [L] Greek Mythology (3)K. Day.

214 [L] Classical Lyric Poetry (3)   K. Day

216 [L] Literature of the Cosmopolis (3)  K. Day

220 [L] Medieval Latin Literature (3) K. Day

222 [L] The Art of History (3)   E. Kramer.

224 [L] Classical Tragedy (3)   K. Day

226 [L] Classical Laughter (3)  K. Day

228 [L] Classical Epic (3)  E. Kramer.

Courses in Greek (GK)

Courses numbered above 200 are normally offered in alternate years.

101-102-103 ELEMENTARY GREEK (3+3+3) K. Day

An introduction to both the New Testament koine and Classical varieties of ancient Greek. By the end of the third term, students have the basic skills needed to read most Attic and Hellenistic prose.

214/314 [L] CLASSICAL LYRIC POETRY (3)  K. Day

Translation of Greek lyric poetry and a survey (in English readings) of classical Greek and Roman lyric. 314 students do upper-division reading and research. Prerequisite: for 214, Greek 103; for 314, Greek above 200. Precludes taking other courses in the Classical Lyric group.

216/316 [L] LITERATURE OF THE COSMOPOLIS( 3) K. Day

Translation of koine Greek texts and a survey (in English readings) of Greek and Roman literature of the koine era. 316 students do upper-division reading and research. Prerequisite:for 216, Greek103; for 316, Greek above 200. Precludes taking other courses in the Literature of the Cosmopolis group.

222/322 [L] THE ART OF HISTORY (3)  E. Kramer.

Translation of Greek historians and a survey (in English readings) of classical Greek and Roman historical writing. 322 students do upper-division reading and research. Prerequisite: for 222, Greek 103; for 322, Greek above 200. Precludes taking other courses in the Art of History group.

224/324 [L] CLASSICAL TRAGEDY (3)  K. Day

Translation of Greek tragedy and a survey (in English readings) of classical Greek and Roman tragedy. 324 students do upper-division reading and research. Prerequisite: for 224, Greek 103; for 324, Greek above 200. Precludes taking other courses in the Classical Tragedy group.

226/326 [L] CLASSICAL LAUGHTER (3) K. Day

Translation of Aristophanes and a survey (in English readings) of classical Greek and Roman comedy and satire. 326 students do upper-division reading and research. Prerequisites: for 226, Greek 103; for 326, Greek above 200. Precludes taking other courses in the Classical Laughter group.

228/328 [L] CLASSICAL EPIC (3) E. Kramer.

Translation of Homeric epic and readings (in English) from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and from Vergil's Aeneid. 328 students do upper-division reading and research.Prerequisite: for 228, Greek 103; for 328,Greek above 200. Precludes taking other courses in the Classical Epic group.

230/330 [P and D] (3) Women in Classical Antiquity K. Day

Translation of readings from Greek authors on women and a cultural survey addressing how both Greek and Roman women lived in the world of the ancient Mediterranean, including the physical spaces they occupied, the roles they played, and the laws that governed them. Readings in Greek may include authors such as Sappho, Plato, and Aristotle. Students in 330 do additional research. Prerequisite for 230, Greek 103; for 330, Greek above 200. Precludes taking other courses in the Women in Antiquity group.

Courses in Latin (LT)

Courses numbered above 200 are normally offered in alternate years.

100 ELEMENTARY LATIN REFRESHER (1) E. Kramer.

For students placed in 102 by the Latin placement test. They may, with the consent of the department, register for 100 (they cannot take 101), and then continue with 102-103. Prerequisites: placement in 102 and consent of department.

101-102-103 ELEMENTARY LATIN (3+3+3) E. Kramer.

The basics of Latin, with appropriate readings in prose and poetry.

214/314 [L] CLASSICAL LYRIC POETRY (3) K. Day

Translation of Latin Lyric poetry and a survey (in English readings) of classical Greek and Roman lyric. 314 students do upper-division reading and research. Prerequisite: for 214, Latin 103; for 314, Latin above 200. Precludes taking other courses in the Classical Lyric group.

216/316 [L] LITERATURE OF THE COSMOPOLIS (3)  K. Day

Translation of the Latin Vulgate or the Satyricon and a survey (in English readings) of Greek and Roman literature of the Hellenistic era. 316 students do upper-division reading and research. Prerequisite: for 216, Latin 103; for 316, Latin above 200. Precludes taking other courses in the Literature of the Cosmopolis group.

220/320 [L] MEDIEVAL LATIN LITERATURE (3) K. Day

Translation of Medieval Latin texts and a survey (in English readings) of Medieval Latin literature. 320 students do upper-division reading and research. Prerequisite: for 220, Latin 103; for 320, Latin above 200. Precludes taking other courses in the Medieval Latin Literature group.

222/322 [L] THE ART OF HISTORY (3)  E. Kramer.

Translation of Latin historians and a survey (in English readings) of classical Greek and Roman historical writing. 322 students do upper-division reading and research. Prerequisite: for 222, Latin 103; for 322, Latin above 200. Precludes taking other courses in the Art of History group.

224/324 [L] CLASSICAL TRAGEDY (3)  K. Day

Translation of tragedy by Seneca and a survey (in English readings) of classical Greek and Roman tragedy. 324 students do upper-division reading and research. Prerequisite: for 224, Latin 103; for 324, Latin above 200. Precludes taking other courses in the Classical Tragedy group.

226/326 [L] CLASSICAL LAUGHTER (3) K. Day

Translation of satires by Horace and a survey (in English readings) of classical Greek and Roman comedy and satire. 326 students do upper-division reading and research. Prerequisite: for 226, Latin 103; for 326,Latin above 200. Precludes taking other courses in the Classical Laughter Group.

228/328 [L] CLASSICAL EPIC (3)  E. Kramer.

Translation from Vergil's Aeneid and readings (in English) from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey and from the Aeneid. 328 students do upper-division reading and research. Prerequisite: for 228, Latin 103; for 328, Latin above 200. Precludes taking other courses in the Classical Epic Group.

230/330 [P] (3) Women in Classical Antiquity K. Day

Translation of readings from Roman authors on women and a cultural survey addressing how both Greek and Roman women lived in the world of the ancient Mediterranean, including the physical spaces they occupied, the roles they played, and the laws that governed them. Readings in Latin may include authors such as Sulpicia, Catullus, Sallust, Livy, and Ovid. Students in 330 do additional research. Prerequisite for 230, Latin 103; for 330, Latin above 200. Precludes taking other courses in the Women in Antiquity group.

Courses in Hebrew (HB)

100-101-102 ELEMENTARY hebrew (2+2+2)  R.Haak.

An introduction to the Hebrew of the Hebrew Bible. By the end of the third term, students will be able to read the text of the Hebrew Bible with the aid of lexica. The sequence is offered when feasible, which is normally every third year.

Individual Studies and Internships

199, 299, 399 DIRECTED STUDY (1+)

Opportunity for students to study a particular subject under a faculty member's guidance. Prerequisite: permission of department chair and instructor.

389 INTERNSHIP: ANALYSIS 
(3+, limit of 3 to count toward graduation)

Analysis of the background, structure and policy issues in the placement organization. During the academic year this course must be taken concurrently with Internship 388 and 389. See Internship for additional information and requirements for internship placements. Prerequisites: acceptance into the program by the internship committee and a declared major or minor in classics.

400 INDEPENDENT STUDY (1+)

Reading and analysis of selected literature.

401 SEMINAR (3)  K. Day .  E. Kramer.

A course with three objectives for the senior Classics major: 1) comprehension of the Classical world--knowing how its disparate times and places touch; 2) consolidation of scholarship--knowing the main research tools of Classics and how to use them in concert; 3) creation--knowing how to contribute to scholarship. Student and professor together design a project to meet the objectives. Prerequisite: consent of department.

 

 World Literature

Note: All literature is read in translation. Language students may read the original texts, but the classes are intended primarily for non-foreign language majors.
 

212 [L] Greek Mythology (3) K. Day
A survey of the major Greek myths and dominant approaches to understanding them. The myths are read primarily within the context of classical tragedy, epic and lyric poetry. Class discussion treats their function in literature and the historical, psychoanalytic and structural views of myth as a mode of thought.

214 [L] Classical Lyric Poetry (3) K. Day
A survey of classical Greek and Roman lyric poetry. Readings include Sappho, Pindar, Catullus, Horace, Ovid, and Propertius. Precludes taking other courses in the Classical Lyric group (see Classics).

216 [L] Literature of the Cosmopolis (3) K. Day
Readings emblematic of the lively interplay of moral change, literary form and cultural confrontation in the Hellenistic era. Included: comedy by Menander, the romantic novel Daphnis and Chloe, and the Satyricon of Petronius. Precludes taking other courses in the Literature of the Cosmopolis group (see Classics).

220 [L] Medieval Latin Literature (3) K. Day
Poetry and prose of the Latin Middle Ages. Precludes taking other courses in the Medieval Latin Literature group (see Classics).

222 [L] The Art of History (3) E. Kramer
Herodotus on exotic peoples, divine justice, and the destined conflict of East and West; Thucydides on nations and human nature; Livy on national myth;Tacitus on the making and breaking of empire--the range of how classical historians made sense of human events. Precludes taking other courses in the Art of History group (see Classics).

224 [L] Classical Tragedy (3) K. Day
Readings in Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Seneca. Precludes taking other courses in the Classical Tragedy group (see Classics).

226 [L] Classical Laughter (3) K. Day
Reading of Greek and Roman comic plays and Roman satire. Precludes taking other courses in the Classical Laughter group (see Classics).

228 [L] Classical Epic (3) E. Kramer
Readings from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and from Vergil's Aeneid.Precludes taking other courses in the Classical Epic group (see Classics).

Date catalog last modified: 29 May 2007
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