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Celebration of Learning, concurrent sessions II

Session II-A: Honors Seminars A

12:15 p.m., Olin 201, Carlisle Evans Peck (biology and environmental Studies), “Heaven and Earth in Little Space:” The Crisis of Biocultural Extinction and How Saving Seeds Can Solve It"

Description: The extinction of biodiversity and the loss of endangered cultures and indigenous knowledge cannot be viewed as separate phenomenon. Culture and biodiversity are inextricably linked: human systems of meaning are founded on species, and ecosystems have been managed by human societies for millennia. This project focuses on the work of three seed banks — the Millennium Seed Bank, Seed Savers Exchange and Native Seed/SEARCH — and their efforts to save rare wild and domesticated plant species along with the cultural knowledge and practice surrounding them. This suggests a broader philosophical shift in plant conservation from plants as isolatable biological entities to beings embedded in systems of knowledge and meaning and inseparable from the human sphere.

12:35 p.m., Olin 201, Jacob Gaier (computer science, mathematics and physics), "Quantum Computing: What It Is, How It Works and Why You Should Care"
Project advisor: Dr. Carroll Morrow

Description: We will discuss what quantum computing is, how it differs from classical computing, and some applications and possible implications of it. In particular, we will look at Grover’s Search Algorithm, Shor’s Factoring Algorithm, and Quantum Cryptography. We also will discuss the ethical and philosophical implications of high-efficiency computing and what some of the algorithms mean for the future of cyber security and privacy. Current and potential future developments in quantum computing may be discussed.

12:55 p.m., Olin 201, Catherine McDermott and Elise McPherson (interdisciplinary), “Something to Say”: Incorporation of Chronic Illness into Adolescent Identity"
Project advisors: Dr. Jason Mahn and Dr. Bob Tallitsch

Description: This qualitative multiple methodology study utilized tenets from both narrative inquiry and grounded theory methodologies to examine the influencing factors of chronic illness on identity development in adolescents. Nine adolescents and young adults participated in semistructured, in-depth interviews centered on their experiences of living with chronic illness. We will present the results of our study, which provide insight into how the illness experiences of these adolescents were incorporated into their identities highlighting the (a) effects of illness, (b) rewards reaped from illness, (c) specific coping techniques utilized, and (d) importance of control over the content and structure of one's narrative.

Session II-B

12:15 p.m., Olin 201,  Megan Bystol (anthropology), "Anyone in French Society: A Cosmopolitan Approach to Second-Generation North African Identity in French Society"
Project advisor: Dr. Adam Kaul

Description: Research performed in Dijon, France, explores naming and identity within second-generation North-Africans. Interviews and participant observation conducted at the field site will be used to analyze the participants’ personal and societal identity. Through the use of cosmopolitan theory, in which global acceptance of diversity strives to create a cohabitative international community, I aim to return the agency of identity back to the individual. This study will focus particularly on Nigel Rapport’s “Anyone” ideology, in which the individual has the ultimate, subjective view of his/her own self-identity. It is the intent of this paper to show how cosmopolitan perspective can be used to help reduce the crise identitre amongst the second-generation North-African population in France.

12:30 p.m., Olin 201,  Hannah Bohn (anthropology), "Telling the Story of Northern Ireland’s Troubles: Tracing the Oral History of Ireland’s Troubled Past Across Contexts"
Project advisor: Dr. Adam Kaul

Description: The ethno-political conflict known as the Troubles occurred in Northern Ireland from the late 1960s to the late 1990s. Community development organizations, youth services and government-funded "Peace projects" have used narrative as a tool for dealing with and remembering Northern Ireland’s troubled past and working toward collective peace. This presentation examines how the Irish tell the story of the Troubles, focusing specifically on how the perspective of the narrator shapes the content and the telling. Additionally, it will discuss how community development and healing projects have dealt with the diversity of stories told about the Troubles in efforts to move forward. While state actors promote a shared narrative for peace work, the more effective approach of grassroots peacebuilders in and about Northern Ireland recognizes the necessity and value of the diversity of stories told about the Troubles.

12:45 p.m., Olin 201,  Emma Howes (anthropology) "Creating Multicultural Identities in a Dual-Language Classroom"
Project advisor: Dr. Adam Kaul

Description: In this presentation, I will discuss the effect that Latino immigration into the Quad Cities has on the public education system, as well as the development of dual-language programs in schools for students who speak English as a second language. Using Victor Turner's theory of liminality and anthropological perspectives on education and third spaces, I examine the effectiveness of the dual-language program in Ericsson Elementary School in Moline in both language acquisition and multicultural identity formation. Ultimately, I demonstrate the power that culture and language have on academic performance and self-identity.

1 p.m., Olin 201,  Helen Myers (anthropology), "Religious Plurality in an Individualistic Society: Where Do We Go From Here?"
Project advisor: Dr. Adam Kaul

Description: In this presentation, I will discuss the effect that Latino immigration into the Quad Cities has on the public education system, as well as the development of dual-language programs in schools for students who speak English as a second language. Using Victor Turner's theory of liminality and anthropological perspectives on education and third spaces, I examine the effectiveness of the dual-language program in Ericsson Elementary School in Moline in both language acquisition and multicultural identity formation. Ultimately, I demonstrate the power that culture and language have on academic performance and self-identity.

Session II-C

12:15 p.m., Olin 305, Mason Broxham (economics) and Emma Cox (biology) "Air Pollution in China – Chinese NGOs"
Advisor: Dr. Dave Dehnel

Description: Urban air pollution is one of the key aspects of the tension between economic growth and environmental health in China today. In January 2012, to the surprise of many, Beijing began releasing air quality reports based on an international standard. The move has been credited by some observers as a major breakthrough in China's environmental governance because, it is argued, environmental activists in China were the major driving force behind the release of information. Since then, the issue of urban air pollution has reemerged as one of the hottest topics in media and on the internet. At the same time, a series of new policies and standards aimed at addressing urban air pollution have been released by the central government and various local governments. To what extent was the recent attention given by the state to urban air quality prompted by Chinese environmental civil society? To what extent is government propaganda still shaping the public perception of the issue? These questions will be addressed by six Augustana students who received funding from the Freeman Foundation to spend three weeks in China this summer. Mason Broxham and Emma Cox will explore the role of Chinese Environmental Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs).

12:35 p.m., Olin 305,  Jessica Flondro (environmental studies) and Aubrey Waddick (political science), "Air Pollution in China – International NGOs"
Advisor: Dr. David Dehnel

Description: Urban air pollution is one of the key aspects of the tension between economic growth and environmental health in China today. In January 2012, to the surprise of many, Beijing began releasing air quality reports based on an international standard. The move has been credited by some observers as a major breakthrough in China's environmental governance because, it is argued, environmental activists in China were the major driving force behind the release of information. Since then, the issue of urban air pollution has reemerged as one of the hottest topics in media and on the internet. At the same time, a series of new policies and standards aimed at addressing urban air pollution have been released by the central government and various local governments. To what extent was the recent attention given by the state to urban air quality prompted by Chinese environmental civil society? To what extent is government propaganda still shaping the public perception of the issue? These questions will be addressed by six Augustana students who received funding from the Freeman Foundation to spend three weeks in China this summer. Jessica Flondro and Aubrey Waddick will explore the roles of international non-governmental organizations. In their presentation, they will briefly review the literature and present their research design.

12:55 p.m., Olin 305, Daisy Hoang (communication studies and Peter Siepiora (biology), "Air Pollution in China – Mass Media"
Advisor: Dr. David Dehnel

Description: Urban air pollution is one of the key aspects of the tension between economic growth and environmental health in China today. In January 2012, to the surprise of many, Beijing began releasing air quality reports based on an international standard. The move has been credited by some observers as a major breakthrough in China's environmental governance because, it is argued, environmental activists in China were the major driving force behind the release of information. Since then, the issue of urban air pollution has reemerged as one of the hottest topics in media and on the internet. At the same time, a series of new policies and standards aimed at addressing urban air pollution have been released by the central government and various local governments. To what extent was the recent attention given by the state to urban air quality prompted by Chinese environmental civil society? To what extent is government propaganda still shaping the public perception of the issue? These questions will be addressed by six Augustana students who received funding from the Freeman Foundation to spend three weeks in China this summer. Daisy Hoang and Peter Siepiora will analyze the content of social media and traditional media and explore the impact of that media on public attitudes.

Session II-D: Texas Medical Center Research Internship Program

12:15 p.m., Hanson 102,  Austin Anderson (virology), "Direct Measurement of Rotavirus NSP4 Viroporin-mediated Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Store Depletion"
Advisor: Dr. Heidi Storl

Description: Rotavirus is a major cause of gastroenteritis in children and annually results in more than 500,000 fatalities worldwide. Upon infection, intestinal cell cytoplasmic calcium concentrations can increase to four times the basal concentration. Rotavirus requires a high calcium environment within the cytoplasm for new viral assembly. The sole expression of rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) is responsible for this disruption of calcium homeostasis. NSP4 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) transmembrane viroporin that has been hypothesized to directly flux calcium from the ER to the cytoplasm. There currently are no employed methods for detecting direct ER calcium release from viroporin activity. To test this hypothesis, a new methodology was created to directly measure the luminal ER calcium concentrations in normal and NSP4-expressing cells. Reengineered ER-targeted Genetically Encoded Calcium Indicators (GECIs) were used to show that wild-type NSP4 directly depleted ER calcium, while a defective NSP4 mutant could not deplete ER calcium. Currently, experiments are underway to test other ER-localized viroporins including human immunodeficiency virus Vpu, human papillomavirus E5, hepatitis C virus p7, and influenza A virus M2. These studies are the first to directly measure ER calcium concentration changes in live cells expressing viroporins and represent an important step to understanding the molecular pathogenesis of rotavirus and potentially other viral pathogens.

12:30 p.m., Hanson 102,  Megan Vander Wall (internship) "Chaplaincy: Beyond the Misconceptions"
Advisor: Dr. Heidi Storl

Description: Chaplaincy is a profession that is widely misunderstood. Being a chaplain does not explicitly mean being religious; being a chaplain is about compassion, understanding, crisis intervention, counseling, spiritual care, etc. While participating in the Texas Medical Center Internship, I focused my energy on the misconceptions of chaplains, their work, and the training they undergo in preparation to become chaplains. The first misconception I focused on was the popular conclusion that everyone and anyone can be a chaplain in a tier 1 hospital with no prior education. While this is a common thought, being a chaplain in a tier one hospital is similar and perhaps even more rigorous than any other degree and certification process. Chaplains within the hospital setting also are subject to judgments about their religious intentions. It is commonly thought that chaplains are available only for those who are religious and are in the business of converting those who do not have a religious affiliation. Another common misconception of the chaplaincy profession is the thought that due to the decline in support for organized religion, chaplains are no longer necessary. These misconceptions help make up the negative connotation that surrounds the chaplaincy profession today. However, while working at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center among skilled chaplains, whose words and actions proved these impressions to be false, it became clear that chaplaincy is a hidden gem among the helping professions, incorporating interfaith ministry, religious and secular perspectives, and a simple helping hand.

12:45 p.m., Hanson 102,  Kristen Yerkes (communication science and disorders) "Speech Pathology and the Palliative Care Patient: True Vocal Fold Augmentation for Vocal Fold Paralysis"
Advisor: Dr. Heidi Storl

Description: Palliative care is the multidisciplinary system of delivering care to patients with life-threatening, terminal illnesses to prevent and relieve suffering of the patients and families. It is a holistic approach of treating the symptoms—physical, psychosocial, emotional, cultural and spiritual suffering—rather than the physical cause of disease (World Health Organization, 2002). The Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP) can be an integral member of the palliative care team to determine the best options for symptom management of a patient suffering from impairments in cognition, communication or swallowing. A common dysfunction treated by the SLP is true vocal fold paralysis (TVFP), which is characterized by immobility of one or both vocal folds. TVFP can jeopardize the integrity of laryngeal function, swallow function, and vocal function, and may require treatment to maintain quality of life and sustain the overall health of the patient. Vocal fold augmentation is a common treatment option for vocal fold paralysis. The two types of augmentation are injection laryngoplasty—a temporary injection into the affected vocal fold—and medialization thyroplasty, a permanent prosthesis placed in the vocal fold. Research shows that injection laryngoplasty can be advantageous in the palliative care setting, as it is a less invasive out-patient procedure, can be performed during the treatment schedule, and provides immediate results. A future academic plan at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center is a retrospective case study that will examine palliative care patients that receive injection laryngoplasty within 12 months of mortality to determine the post-treatment functional and laryngeal outcomes.

1 p.m., Hanson 102,  Margaret Yuk (biology) Late-radiation-associated Dysphagia (late-RAD) with Lower Cranial Neuropathies (LCNP) in Long-term Oropharyngeal Cancer (OPC) Survivors: Case Reports"
Advisor: Dr. Heidi Storl

Description: LCNP are a rare complication of radiation, typically reported in nasopharyngeal cancer survivors. Limited data examine LCNP after treatment of OPC, particularly as they relate to late-RAD. Cases with late-RAD and LCNP in survivorship after OPC were examined longitudinally. Late-RAD was assessed per MBSImp, PAS, PSS-HN and MDADI; LCNP per clinical cranial nerve examination and laryngeal videostroboscopy. Two cases presenting with LCNP and late-RAD four and a half and 19 years after nonsurgical organ preservation were examined for six and four years, respectively. Distinct trajectories of late-RAD were seen in the setting of stable versus progressive LCNP. Phenotypes of dysphagia mirrored loss of specific cranial nerve functions, and standardized scores indicated profound impairment in both cases. Late-RAD with LCNP causes profound functional impairment and adversely affects quality of life. Radiation-associated LCNP can be a stable or progressive condition. Trajectories of late-RAD may coincide with loss of cranial nerve function.

1:15 p.m., Hanson 102,  Nichole Brammer (genetics/microbiology) "Chromosome Dynamics in Live Bacterial Cells"
Advisor: Dr. Heidi Storl

Description: For the life of a bacterium to continue on, it must have the ability to replicate itself. More importantly, it needs to be able to replicate the genetic code, or chromosome, that contains its instructions for life. The steps in which the E. coli copies its chromosome are not completely understood. For example, for a bacterium cell to replicate, it must divide into two. Before the cell divides, it must first make two copies of its genetic information and send these copies to opposite sides of the cell. This way, when it divides, each new cell has the proper instructions. The mechanism for how a bacterium is able to move these copies to opposite sides is currently unknown. If we had a better understanding of this process, it could explain genetic disorders involving incorrect chromosome replication. My project was to add color-coded markers to various random spots in an E. coli chromosome. This way, these markers could be viewed under a microscope as they were replicated and moved to their spots on opposite sides of the cell before the cell itself became two and life continued anew.

Session II-E

12:15 p.m., Old Main 117,  Alexandra Blust (religion) "Communes, Monasteries and Freedom"
Advisor: Dr. Laura Hartman

Description: Often individuals who live in communes, monasteries and other intentional communities claim to live a life that is markedly more “free” than the life they could live outside of the community. This project examines freedom in a secular commune (Twin Oaks in Louisa, Va.) and a religious monastery (St. Mary's Monastery in Rock Island, Ill.) to better understand how religion in an intentional community impacts a community member’s experience of freedom. A thorough analysis of freedom in each of these communities leads to the finding that what functions as religion in a community is central to members’ freedom. Something that functions as religion is essential for freedom in a community. This study concludes with an examination of what members of mainstream society can learn from freedom in intentional communities. Community members’ individual freedom is situated in the context of community commitment.

12:35 p.m., Old Main 117,  John Joyce (religion) "What Might An Athlete Mean When He or She Gives Glory to God?"
Advisor: Dr. Daniel Morris

Description: Using Clifford Geertz's definition of ethnography and thick description from his work The Interpretation of Cultures, I was able to understand a few possibilities of what an athlete could mean when he or she gives glory to God after a contest. The few possibilities that my project investigates are: the Catholic view of human participation in grace, the Holy War Christian, the Libertines of Geneva, and the Classical Protestant. For each of these possibilities, I examine the way in which each participates in work, grace and faith, and how this participation ultimately shows how each possibility believes it has the way to salvation. For instance, the Catholic view of human participation in grace, work and faith have to be in conjunction while participating in grace for a Christian to have salvation. Another example is the Classical Protestants who believe that faith is at the center, while work is an extension of this faith. Therefore, it is ultimately the Classical Protestant’s faith in grace that they receive salvation. The implication of my research shows that there are many possible meanings to an athlete’s statement of glory to God that may have a significant impact of their beliefs of salvation.

12:55 p.m., Old Main 117,  Jorie Muraida (religion) "Designer Babies: An Ethical Dilemma"
Advisor: Dr. Dan Lee

Description: This project evaluates genetic engineering and the idea of “designer babies.” Specifically, this project explores the ethical implications behind the subject in order to decide if genetic engineering on humans should be done and to what extent. In recent years, advances in reproductive technologies have flourished. Not only are parents able to eliminate undesirable traits, but selecting for desirable traits are becoming a prevalent issue in genetic testing and engineering today. None of these issues, however, come without ethical implications. Is it ethical to perform genetic screening and tests? Once the tests are performed, what are the ethical next steps? Is it ethical to select positive traits of one's offspring and produce so-called “designer babies?” The list of questions and concerns go on and on. While there are always going to be many ethical issues with the genetic engineering of humans, genetic engineering can be a great benefit to humans when it is being used to benefit the direct health of the individual.

Session II-F

12:15 p.m., Old Main Forum,  Carrie Reitz, Megan Boedecker, Catrina Doyle, Chrissy Kunkel, Isaac Lauritsen, Elizabeth O'Hara, Alli Petrassi, Laura Seeber, Malcolm Simon and Tyler Spellious (English), "The Stories We Tell: Modernism Comes to the Tri-Cities"
Advisor: Dr. Meg Gillette

Description: During the winter of 2014, a group of English majors studying modernism started wondering about the literary history of the Quad Cities. We had heard about the Pulitzer-Prize-winning playwright Susan Glaspell—the Davenport native whom many consider one of America’s top playwrights—and, impressed that such a talent came from our hometown, wondered if there might be other literary talents from the Tri-Cities worth recovering.

During this session, we’ll share the astonishing literature we uncovered: letters from Dakota Indians imprisoned at Camp McClellan, Alice French’s regionalist stories of same-sex desire, Buffalo Bill’s romantic vision of the American West, Arthur Davison Ficke’s satire of modern poetry, Floyd Dell’s radical writing about women and the labor movement, Susan Glaspell’s yellow journalism and existential dramas, Cornelia Meig’s Newberry-Award-winning children’s literature, and Charlotte Russell Murray’s ground-breaking mysteries. Far from the homogenous, repressive place the Midwest often is taken to be, the Tri-Cities that emerges from this body of literature is more cosmopolitan and progressive than we had ever imagined. And yet it was also a place of cleavages—of racial conflict, class divides, and changing roles for women. As we listen to the writings of these Tri-Cities writers, we’ll hear how literary artists wrote back to the challenges and fears of the day, developing their own solutions and hopes for the future. As it turns out, Quad-Citians have a lot to be proud of in their literary history, and as this literature has inspired us, we hope it will inspire others as well.

Session II-G

12:15 p.m., Olin 209,  Alison Nelson, Amy Maplethorpe, Breann Nelson, Kaitlynn Markowski, Jessica Bacon, Alicia Hughes, Brittany Burk, Leah Baumgart and Kerry Robbins (psychology), "The Effects of Culture on Childhood Development"
Advisor: Dr. Jayne Rose

Description: As a result of the study abroad program examining the effect of culture on child development, 20 Augustana students alongside two Augustana professors traveled to Guatemala with the intention to observe and learn from those residing in the country. Prior to our departure, we examined Bronfenbrenner's Ecological systems theory, in addition to other scholarly works. This theory details how an individual is inextricably linked to their microsystem, mesosystem, exosystem and macrosystem. It is important to note that everything in Bronfenbrenner's theory occurs within a context and that each occurrence can affect a system in a positive or negative manner. As students, we understood this theory and were able to discuss the possible implications with regards to childhood development. However, it was not until we visited the small community of Santa Catarina, Ixtahuacan, that we truly grasped the implications of poverty and violence on those in a developing country. While visiting the community, leaders of el Buen Sembrador (The Good Sower) presented on their association’s efforts to provide for those in need. Dedicated to growing food for the 90 percent living in the area that are considered to be in poverty or extreme poverty and have been affected by several natural disasters, this community has demonstrated the importance of building relationships, maintaining relationships and intentionality. The purpose of this presentation is to explain how our experiences deepened our understanding of the scholarly material we read.

1 p.m., Olin 209,  Emily Seminary (French) "Heredity and Eugenics: How Our Understanding of Heredity Led to the Eugenics Movement in France"
Advisor: Dr. Sarah Skrainka

Description: The eugenics movement typically is considered today as the work of prejudiced people manipulating science in the name of social hygiene. According to this view, this manipulation ultimately led to a movement in many western countries that sterilized innocent victims who were declared too flawed to breed. While this statement certainly has some truth to it, it is neither an entirely correct nor a fair view of this portion of western history. When one analyzes it with a more neutral eye, one can see that while eugenics had many faults that, coupled with the social context, ultimately caused its demise in the mid-20th century, there are many attractive goals of social hygiene that made it difficult for many to oppose. Also, when one considers the comprehension of heredity at the time, it can be seen how many believed they had scientific evidence on their side. For this Senior Inquiry project, I analyzed how the understanding of heredity at the time, as well as the social context, logically lead to eugenics taking hold across the western world and how the movement in France differed from the more extreme practices in the United States and Great Britain.

Session II-H

12:15 p.m., Old Main 132, Dr. Kathy Jakielski (communication sciences and disorders) "Who Invited You?: A Critical Look at My Service Learning Course"

Description: As part of my sabbatical leave, I spent eight weeks immersed in the work of the monks of Wat Damnak's Life and Hope Association (LHA) in Siem Reap, Cambodia. LHA is an indigenous NGO serving the poorest members in their own communities. The purpose of my stay was to be able to engage in ongoing conversation with the monks of Wat Damnak about their work and in their work, so that I could learn enough about them to be able to design and develop an ethical service learning experience as part of my Cambodia Term course. In this presentation, I'll discuss the potential harm we can inflict under the guise of service and how I am trying to minimize that harm using the lessons I learned during my time abroad.

12:30 p.m., Old Main 132,   Lauren Williamson and Lauranne Schonne (communication sciences and disorders); Mary Liles, Chase Matzinger, Samantha Swanborg and Patrick Ruddy (secondary education), "Teaching at Schools for the Deaf and Blind; On Our Experience at FSDB"
Advisor: Dr. Deborah Bracke

Description: The Florida School for the Deaf and Blind (FSDB) provides an impressive learning environment with free access to resources, specialists, health care and opportunities for qualifying students in Florida. The passionate community has much to offer each student beyond high quality academics; FSDB supports and delights in individuals’ strengths. Four Augustana secondary education majors and two communication sciences and disorders majors spent a week observing and getting involved in the FSDB community both academically and in extracurricular activities. Through working in preK-12 classrooms and interviewing a variety of specialists, teachers, administrators and other faculty, we learned approaches to teaching that are beneficial to all students, whether they are blind, deaf, both or neither. FSDB staff members were eager to advise, share resources and communicate their passions to us, but most of all we learned from the students themselves. Our experiences taught us what it means to be a part of the deaf or blind community, and we were able to experience the strengths, the achievements, the pride and the struggles. We were introduced to assistive technologies, differentiated instruction, and the variety of ways students can express their learning.

12:45 p.m., Old Main 132,  Mackenzie Ostermeier (Psychology) "Volunteer Work and Intercultural Effectiveness"
Advisor: Dr. Mark Salisbury

Description: For my Senior Inquiry, I researched volunteer work and intercultural effectiveness.

1 p.m., Old Main 132,  Dr. Rosita Tendall (music), "Longfellow ESL Students Sing to English Literacy"

Description: ESL elementary-age students who participated in singing and moving activities over a six-month period increased their English language skills faster than a control group of ESL students.